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The art of Casual Nonconformity

By Amy SpitzleyOkay, stop reading. I know it’s a strange thing to say before you’ve really started, but humor me. Now look at the person next to you. You may not know this but she–or he–might be a Casual Nonconformist. You might even be one yourself.

It’s okay if you don’t know it. We do tend to blend in. I’m not talking the grimacing, spike-topped, leather-clad nonconformity of bygone days. This is a softer version.

If you’re a woman who doesn’t like diamonds, you might be a Casual Nonconformist. If you’re a guy who doesn’t do football, or you have a kid who’s never attacked Guitar Hero; if you have never experimented with hair dye, you might be a Casual Nonconformist.

If you are, welcome to the party! It’s a small party, but it’s still fun. We’re not out to change the world or anything. We won’t kick you out if you’re into Nascar or stilettos or other things we can’t wrap our minds around. We’re just here doing our thing, same as you.

If you write young adult fantasy books because that’s where your mind likes to live, you might be a Casual Nonconformist. If you have kids that say odd things, like “Mama, will I be really hot or really cold just before I die?”…well, if you have a kid like that, call me. I’d love to know mine isn’t the only one!

What I’m getting at here is that this blog will be about equal opportunity nonconformity. I’m a small goofy-type person who likes to put my own spin on things. I bet a lot of you are like that.

After all, another word for Casual Nonconformity is just plain old Humanity. Yours, mine, etcetera. I like to think I approach life from a slightly different direction than most people, and I plan on telling you all about it here.

Follow along if you want to. I can’t promise anything earth-shattering, but I can guarantee a high quirkiness factor. I plan to have fun with this.

And for me, that’s the best way to be.

  • Ed Hahnenberg

    Amy…If you’re a guy who doesn’t do football…that's me! I have little interest in today’s Super Bowl 44. For the New Orleans Saints, though, it’s a win-win event. For the Big Easy, hit hard by Katrina, the game is a spirit-lifting event, win or lose…not that it needs any spirit-lifting with the money the non-stop pre-Lenten parties and parades this season of the year bring to the city’s economy. For Peyton Manning of the Colts, he could win another MVP award to twin with the one from his last Miami Super Bowl. Players on the winning team get a $73,000 bonus. With millions unemployed, how’s that going for ya, big guy?

    The money spent on this year’s Super Bowl, according to RetailNet, will come close to, or exceed $10,000,000,000. Let’s put that in perspective.

    The massive international response to Haiti's earthquake has brought more than $2 billion in aid to the stricken Caribbean nation, by the United Nations' reckoning. That's a stunning figure, but it comes with a giant asterisk: So far, the vast majority of the aid, more than 85 percent, has been earmarked or promised but not yet delivered or disbursed. The cost of rebuilding Haiti will be enormous, possibly beyond $10 billion.

    Think of it…one game could rebuild a country.

    Or look at the money spent on this one game in other ways:

    According to UNICEF, the full cost of universal primary education by the year 2010 would amount to $7 billion per year. The money spent on this year’s Super Bowl well exceeds this amount.

    The World Malaria report, produced by the World Health Organization in 2008, sited an estimate of 881,000 malaria deaths in 2006. Children under 5 years of age constituted 85 percent of those. Prevention and treatment of malaria in Africa costs approximately $3.2 billion annually. Cumulative spending on the Super Bowl could save a million people from dying of malaria for three years. Three million lives, one game.

    The new poverty estimates released in August 2008 by the World Bank show that about 1.4 billion people in the developing world, or one in four people on the global scale, were living below the poverty line in 2005. The numerical threshold used to determine poverty was set at $1.25 per day. That is not $1.25 in spending money. Rather, it is $1.25 per day on food, housing, clothing, water, education and medical care. Everything.

    During a good year a person living on $1.25 per day spends $456. According to CNN Money, the average cost for a 30-second commercial spot during this year's game was $2.7 million, Thirty seconds of a Super Bowl commercial could pay yearly expenses for almost 6,000 of such people.

    Congress just raised the debt ceiling to over $14 trillion. $10 billion is .07% of that…that’s 7 / 100ths of one percent. Let’s not even go there. We are so deep in debt in this country, that it would take 1237 Super Bowls to pay off what we currently owe.

    Enjoy the game, Americans, as you pig out on your booze and snacks. According to Associated Content, no fewer than $55 million will be spent on food for this year's Super Bowl. Good times, good times.

    I'll be the Casual Nonconformist today.

  • Ed Hahnenberg

    Amy…If you’re a guy who doesn’t do football…that’s me! I have little interest in today’s Super Bowl 44. For the New Orleans Saints, though, it’s a win-win event. For the Big Easy, hit hard by Katrina, the game is a spirit-lifting event, win or lose…not that it needs any spirit-lifting with the money the non-stop pre-Lenten parties and parades this season of the year bring to the city’s economy. For Peyton Manning of the Colts, he could win another MVP award to twin with the one from his last Miami Super Bowl. Players on the winning team get a $73,000 bonus. With millions unemployed, how’s that going for ya, big guy?

    The money spent on this year’s Super Bowl, according to RetailNet, will come close to, or exceed $10,000,000,000. Let’s put that in perspective.

    The massive international response to Haiti’s earthquake has brought more than $2 billion in aid to the stricken Caribbean nation, by the United Nations’ reckoning. That’s a stunning figure, but it comes with a giant asterisk: So far, the vast majority of the aid, more than 85 percent, has been earmarked or promised but not yet delivered or disbursed. The cost of rebuilding Haiti will be enormous, possibly beyond $10 billion.

    Think of it…one game could rebuild a country.

    Or look at the money spent on this one game in other ways:

    According to UNICEF, the full cost of universal primary education by the year 2010 would amount to $7 billion per year. The money spent on this year’s Super Bowl well exceeds this amount.

    The World Malaria report, produced by the World Health Organization in 2008, sited an estimate of 881,000 malaria deaths in 2006. Children under 5 years of age constituted 85 percent of those. Prevention and treatment of malaria in Africa costs approximately $3.2 billion annually. Cumulative spending on the Super Bowl could save a million people from dying of malaria for three years. Three million lives, one game.

    The new poverty estimates released in August 2008 by the World Bank show that about 1.4 billion people in the developing world, or one in four people on the global scale, were living below the poverty line in 2005. The numerical threshold used to determine poverty was set at $1.25 per day. That is not $1.25 in spending money. Rather, it is $1.25 per day on food, housing, clothing, water, education and medical care. Everything.

    During a good year a person living on $1.25 per day spends $456. According to CNN Money, the average cost for a 30-second commercial spot during this year’s game was $2.7 million, Thirty seconds of a Super Bowl commercial could pay yearly expenses for almost 6,000 of such people.

    Congress just raised the debt ceiling to over $14 trillion. $10 billion is .07% of that…that’s 7 / 100ths of one percent. Let’s not even go there. We are so deep in debt in this country, that it would take 1237 Super Bowls to pay off what we currently owe.

    Enjoy the game, Americans, as you pig out on your booze and snacks. According to Associated Content, no fewer than $55 million will be spent on food for this year’s Super Bowl. Good times, good times.

    I’ll be the Casual Nonconformist today.

  • Gloria Veltman

    Amy:

    Not sure if you got my initial welcome so I thought I would do another. (You see why I need your husband to coach me on technical things? I am challenged by something this simple!
    In any case, your first post is a delightful breath of fresh air. Welcome!

    Always,

    gloria

  • Gloria Veltman

    Amy:

    Not sure if you got my initial welcome so I thought I would do another. (You see why I need your husband to coach me on technical things? I am challenged by something this simple!
    In any case, your first post is a delightful breath of fresh air. Welcome!

    Always,

    gloria

    • Name

      Thanks Gloria! Wait till you see my pet segment…(hee-hee)

  • Name

    Thanks Gloria! Wait till you see my pet segment…(hee-hee)

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